Tangible Memories

team from the University of Bristol are working with us on an exciting project called Tangible Memories: Community in Care.

Tangible Memories is a collaboration between a team of researchers from the University of Bristol, local artists, Alive!, older people (from Bristol Care Settings) and Care Sector professionals. The goal of the project is to help improve the quality of life for care home residents by building a sense of shared experience through exploration of individual life stories.

As well as enabling participants to create memory objects they can keep and share, the project has developed interactive objects for reminiscence, a life story app called ‘Story Creator’ and community spaces known as ‘Parlours of Wonder within care homes which aim to increase positive activity culture and enhance multigenerational activity within the care home.

 

Story creator

The life story app called ‘Story Creator’ is a brilliant tool for care staff or family members who want an easy to use tool for life story work with an older person. The great thing about this app is that it you can create pages capturing photos, text and audio clips, which can be printed, audio scanned and/or made into a book which can be kept by the older person or given as a gift to family members or friends.

Download the app here

See more about some of the amazing technology used in the project Objects of Exchange

 

Parlours of Wonder

 

Community engagement is increasingly recognised by the care sector and social care commissioners as vital in tackling issues of social isolation in our older populations living in care.

The Tangible memories team and partners are co-designing engaging community spaces (Parlours of Wonder) where older people can interact with evocative objects, a Life story app ‘Story Creator’ and our other prototypes to record and share their memories and life histories. This part of the project involves imagining and creating a new space of discovery, connection, meaning making and mystery, rather like the ‘cabinets of curiosity’ or ‘wonder rooms’ of old.